glyphosate

Roundup and XtendImax are Dangerous

Monsanto has trouble with its herbicides. It began with the weed killer Roundup, which is thought to cause cancer. The primary ingredient in Roundup is glyphosate. Farmers widely use Roundup to treat soybean and corn crops to prevent weeds. Many homeowners also use Roundup on their lawns and in their gardens. Monsanto also now sells genetically modified seeds called “Roundup Ready.” Crops grown from Roundup Ready seed are resistant to Roundup and are not damaged by the herbicide. From 1996 to 2011, Roundup Ready crops increased the use of Roundup in the United States by 527 million pounds. 

Monsanto has been accused of falsifying data on the safety of Roundup and of falsely claiming that Roundup is “biodegradable” and “environmentally friendly.”

However, in 1985, the United States Environmental Protection Agency reported a link between Roundup and the risk of cancer. In 2013, the scientific journal Entropy published a study that concluded that glyphosate “negative impact on the body is insidious and manifests slowly over time as inflammation damages cellular systems throughout the body.” In March 2015, the World Health Organization issued a report that stated the glyphosate contained in Roundup is a “probable human carcinogen,” caused cancer in lab animal studies, and damages human DNA. Despite the scientific data linking Roundup to cancer, Monsanto continued to sell Roundup.

Consumers who have been diagnosed with Non-Hodgin’s Lymphoma and other cancers after exposure to Roundup may be able to sue Monsanto (which is now part of the pharmaceutical company Bayer) for damages including medical expenses, lost past and future wages, pain and suffering, and other expenses.

But the Roundup story doesn’t end there. When weeds seemed to be developing a resistance to Roundup, Monsanto started producing herbicides containing another problematic chemical called dicamba, marketed as Xtendamax. Monsanto also developed crop seeds that are resistant to dicamba. Now farmers who want to use Xtendamax must also purchase and plant Monsanto’s dicamba resistant seeds. Farmers or property owners who don’t use Monsanto’s seeds may have devastating damage to their crops because Monsanto’s dicamba herbicide is known to drift off target, sometimes for miles. Because of this problem, some states have now banned or severely restricted the use of Monsanto’s Xtendamax herbicide. Tennessee has not prohibited its use. Alexander Law is representing tobacco farmers and others whose crops have been damaged by Monsanto’s dicamba-containing herbicide. Monsanto has trouble with its herbicides. It began with the weed killer Roundup, which is thought to cause cancer. The primary ingredient in Rounddup is glyphosate. Farmers widely use Roundup to treat soybean and corn crops to prevent weeds. Many homeowners also use Roundup on their lawns and in their gardens. Monsanto also now sells genetically modified seeds called “Roundup Ready.” Crops grown from Roundup Ready seed are resistant to Roundup and are not damaged by the herbicide. From 1996 to 2011, Roundup Ready crops increased the use of Roundup in the United States by 527 million pounds. 

Monsanto has been accused of falsifying data on the safety of Roundup and of falsely claiming that Roundup is “biodegradable” and “environmentally friendly.”

However, in 1985, the United States Environmental Protection Agency reported a link between Roundup and the risk of cancer. In 2013, the scientific journal Entropy published a study that concluded that glyphosate “negative impact on the body is insidious and manifests slowly over time as inflammation damages cellular systems throughout the body.” In March 2015, the World Health Organization issued a report that stated the glyphosate contained in Roundup is a “probable human carcinogen,” caused cancer in lab animal studies, and damages human DNA. Despite the scientific data linking Roundup to cancer, Monsanto continued to sell Roundup.

Consumers who have been diagnosed with Non-Hodgin’s Lymphoma and other cancers after exposure to Roundup may be able to sue Monsanto (which is now part of the pharmaceutical company Bayer) for damages including medical expenses, lost past and future wages, pain and suffering, and other expenses.

But the Roundup story doesn’t end there. When weeds seemed to be developing a resistance to Roundup, Monsanto started producing herbicides containing another problematic chemical called dicamba, marketed as Xtendamax. Monsanto also developed crop seeds that are resistant to dicamba. Now farmers who want to use Xtendamax must also purchase and plant Monsanto’s dicamba resistant seeds. Farmers or property owners who don’t use Monsanto’s seeds may have devastating damage to their crops because Monsanto’s dicamba herbicide is known to drift off target, sometimes for miles. Because of this problem, some states have now banned or severely restricted the use of Monsanto’s Xtendamax herbicide. Tennessee has not prohibited its use. Alexander Law is representing tobacco farmers and others whose crops have been damaged by Monsanto’s dicamba-containing herbicide.